Witness the devastation and recovery from Hurricane Katrina on a guided tour that takes you through hard-hit neighborhoods of New Orleans such as the Ninth Ward, Lakeview, Gentilly and St Bernard. See high floodwater marks and levees that failed as you hear firsthand accounts of the storm from your expert guide. Take in the storm-damaged home of musician Fats Domino, the Hurricane Katrina Memorial and rebuilding projects championed by celebrities. Learn what caused the destruction as well as the history of New Orleans from your knowledgeable local guide on this comprehensive tour.

Make your way to the meeting point at a convenient location in the French Quarter. Board your comfortable air-conditioned coach and listen as your local guide shares the history of New Orleans, starting with how the site of the original French settlement of 1718 grew into the city we know today.

Travel to several neighborhoods including the Lakeview, Gentilly, St Bernard, and Ninth Ward, which were hit hard by Hurricane Katrina, considered the most destructive Atlantic tropical cyclone of 2005. Your guide takes you past one of the breached levees, such as the 17th Street Canal in Lakeview, the London Avenue Canal in Gentilly, or the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) and Industrial Canal in the Ninth Ward. See the high water marks, memorials and vacant lots in these neighborhoods.
During your tour, your guide explains the connections between disappearing coastal wetlands, oil and gas pipelines, levee protection systems and the destruction in New Orleans.

You also see several rebuilding efforts including the Make It Right houses in the Lower Ninth Ward, an innovative project founded by actor Brad Pitt. In the same area, pass by famous musician Fats Domino's house, which was badly damaged in the floodwaters and later restored. Continue alongside a community for musicians who lost their houses in the hurricane; called Musician's Village, the project was conceived of by Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr along with Habitat for Humanity.

Then take in the Hurricane Katrina Memorial, which memorializes the 1,100 people who died in the hurricane, one of the greatest natural and man-made disasters in US history. Also, hear about the importance of the port of New Orleans and stretch your legs when you stop at New Orleans City Park for a short break.

After three hours, you are returned to your starting point where your tour ends.

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